What Goes Up: Recent Trends in China’s Energy Consumption

TitleWhat Goes Up: Recent Trends in China’s Energy Consumption
Publication TypeReport
Year of Publication2000
AuthorsJonathan E Sinton, David Fridley
Date Published02/20000
InstitutionLawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
KeywordsChina, China Energy, China Energy Group, energy analysis and environmental impacts department, energy consumption, ghg emissions
Abstract

Since 1996, China's energy output has dropped by 17%, while primary energy use has fallen by 4%, driven almost entirely by shrinking output from coal mines and declining direct use. Since China is the world's second-largest emitter of greenhouse gases, it is important to understand the sources of this apparent transformation, and whether it portends a permanent change in patterns of energy use. This remarkable reversal of the long-term expansion of energy use has occurred even as the economy has continued to grow, albeit more slowly than in the early 1990s. Generation of electric power has risen, implying a steep fall in end uses, particularly in industry. Available information points to a variety of forces contributing to this phenomenon, including rapid improvements in coal quality, structural changes in industry, shutdowns of factories in both the state-owned and non-state segments of the economy, improvements in end-use efficiency, and greater use of gas and electricity in households. A combination of slowing economic growth, industrial restructuring, broader economic system reforms, and environmental and energy-efficiency policies has apparently led to at least a temporary decline in, and perhaps a long-term reduction in the growth of energy use, and therefore greenhouse gas emissions.

LBNL Report Number

LBL-44283